MND Association joins as a Founding Partner of the Neurodegeneration Medicines Acceleration Program

MRCTEver since the G8 summit on Dementia less than a year ago there has been a huge upsurge in international research activity in the field. In the UK, our friends at MRC Technology (an independent medical research charity which aims to bridge the gap between fundamental research and clinical application) were instrumental in forming a Dementia Consortium to aid drug discovery and help charities, universities and drug companies to work more closely together.

Earlier this year, the MND Association and ALS Association met with MRCT to discuss the possibility of extending the collaborative model across other neurodegenerative diseases such as MND and Parkinson’s disease.  This idea has generated a lot of enthusiasm from charities and patient organisations on both sides of the Atlantic, which has resulted in the launch of the Neurodegeneration Medicines Acceleration Program at the Partnering for Cures conference in New York.  Read the rest of this entry »

Lessons learnt from cancer – identifying the causes of MND

Published in Lancet Neurology on 7 October 2014, Association-funded researcher, Prof Ammar Al-Chalabi based at King’s College London, and an international team of researchers have used a new approach to study the causes of MND.

Under the leadership of Prof Neil Pearce, based at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, researchers have used a mathematical approach previously used by cancer researchers to explain why MND is an adult-onset disease, and why it varies (even within families). Read the rest of this entry »

New inherited MND-causing gene identified – TUBA4A

An international team of researchers, led by MND Association-funded researchers based at King’s College London, have identified mistakes in the TUBA4A gene as a new cause of the rare inherited form of MND.

This new MND-causing gene causes the cell’s structure, or skeleton, to break down – resulting in the cell being unable to transport molecules from one end of the cell to the other.

TUBA4A falls off the track

The TUBA4A gene is responsible for the Tubulin, alpha 4A protein and the researchers have found that the genetic mistake in the TUBA4A gene causes the microtubule network to breakdown in MND.

The microtubule network is a bit like a railway system. Normally, the healthy TUBA4A protein acts like a train, allowing the cell to transport molecules along this railway track to where they’re needed. As well as transporting molecules around the cell, the microtubule also acts as a skeleton within it (known as the ‘cytoskeleton’). Read the rest of this entry »

What should be top of palliative and end of life research To Do list?

At the beginning of the week, the Palliative and End of Life Care Priority Setting Partnership (peolcPSP) launched a survey. Its aim is to help those with a passion for finding answers in the neglected area of palliative care research work out what should be top of their To Do lists. The MND Association is one of the partners in the project led by Marie Curie Cancer Care and supported by the James Lind Alliance.

We’re asking people with MND, their families and carers, healthcare professionals and clinicians to rate a set of 83 questions. For each question you can say whether you think it is a low or high priority for research.  Read the rest of this entry »

Toxic proteins may cause motor neurones to die in C9orf72 MND

MND Association and Alzheimer’s Research UK-funded researchers from University College London have identified that toxic proteins may cause motor neurones to die in C9orf72 MND and frontotemporal dementia. Published open access in the journal Science on Thursday 7 August, this research explains more about one of the most common forms of inherited MND.

The brain of a transgenic fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, used to study neurodegenerative diseases, with cell nuclei (stained purple) and glial cells (green). Image courtesy of Teresa Niccoli, UCL Institute of Ageing, London, UK.

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From genes to the clinic: MND Association and ALS Association-funded researcher wins the ENCALS Young Investigator Award 2014

After attending the ENCALS meeting in May I was busy scheduling the ‘blog a day’ in June, which meant I didn’t get chance to actually report on any developments from the meeting. During our ‘blog a day’ we wrote a lot about genetics, in terms of the UK MND Whole Genome Sequencing project and the UK MND DNA bank. Therefore, I thought it would be a good opportunity to introduce a different area of genetic research and how it relates to what’s going on in the clinic.

The Award

During the European Network for a Cure of ALS (ENCALS) 2014 meeting (Leuven, Belgium 22 – 24 May 2014), Dr Ashley Jones, was awarded the Young Investigator Award.

It’s a highlight of the annual meeting, which showcases and recognises the work of the next generation of researchers in the field of MND, in this case, King’s College London-based Ashley.

But how does it feel to win such a prestigious award? Ashley said:

“Ammar phoned late Sunday evening, in a grave tone, and asked me if I was sitting down. I sat down, and began to worry. When he told me the news, I became inarticulate. I think there was some joyous laughter, and then I repeatedly asked him ‘really!?’”.

Prof Dame Pam Shaw presenting Dr Ashley Jones with the 2014 ENCALS Young Investigator Award

Prof Dame Pam Shaw presenting Dr Ashley Jones with the 2014 ENCALS Young Investigator Award

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