New inherited MND-causing gene identified – TUBA4A

An international team of researchers, led by MND Association-funded researchers based at King’s College London, have identified mistakes in the TUBA4A gene as a new cause of the rare inherited form of MND.

This new MND-causing gene causes the cell’s structure, or skeleton, to break down – resulting in the cell being unable to transport molecules from one end of the cell to the other.

TUBA4A falls off the track Read the rest of this entry »

What should be top of palliative and end of life research To Do list?

At the beginning of the week, the Palliative and End of Life Care Priority Setting Partnership (peolcPSP) launched a survey. Its aim is to help those with a passion for finding answers in the neglected area of palliative care research work out what should be top of their To Do lists. The MND Association is one of the partners in the project led by Marie Curie Cancer Care and supported by the James Lind Alliance.

We’re asking people with MND, their families and carers, healthcare professionals and clinicians to rate a set of 83 questions. For each question you can say whether you think it is a low or high priority for research.  Read the rest of this entry »

Toxic proteins may cause motor neurones to die in C9orf72 MND

MND Association and Alzheimer’s Research UK-funded researchers from University College London have identified that toxic proteins may cause motor neurones to die in C9orf72 MND and frontotemporal dementia. Published open access in the journal Science on Thursday 7 August, this research explains more about one of the most common forms of inherited MND.

The brain of a transgenic fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, used to study neurodegenerative diseases, with cell nuclei (stained purple) and glial cells (green). Image courtesy of Teresa Niccoli, UCL Institute of Ageing, London, UK.

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From genes to the clinic: MND Association and ALS Association-funded researcher wins the ENCALS Young Investigator Award 2014

After attending the ENCALS meeting in May I was busy scheduling the ‘blog a day’ in June, which meant I didn’t get chance to actually report on any developments from the meeting. During our ‘blog a day’ we wrote a lot about genetics, in terms of the UK MND Whole Genome Sequencing project and the UK MND DNA bank. Therefore, I thought it would be a good opportunity to introduce a different area of genetic research and how it relates to what’s going on in the clinic.

The Award

During the European Network for a Cure of ALS (ENCALS) 2014 meeting (Leuven, Belgium 22 – 24 May 2014), Dr Ashley Jones, was awarded the Young Investigator Award.

It’s a highlight of the annual meeting, which showcases and recognises the work of the next generation of researchers in the field of MND, in this case, King’s College London-based Ashley.

But how does it feel to win such a prestigious award? Ashley said:

“Ammar phoned late Sunday evening, in a grave tone, and asked me if I was sitting down. I sat down, and began to worry. When he told me the news, I became inarticulate. I think there was some joyous laughter, and then I repeatedly asked him ‘really!?’”.

Prof Dame Pam Shaw presenting Dr Ashley Jones with the 2014 ENCALS Young Investigator Award

Prof Dame Pam Shaw presenting Dr Ashley Jones with the 2014 ENCALS Young Investigator Award

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Sheffield work towards a treatment for SOD1 form of MND

A number of articles were published in various news sources on 11 July 2014, highlighting how scientists in Sheffield are working towards testing a promising treatment for a rare inherited form of MND caused by the SOD1 gene. Here we write about the research and what it means for people living with MND.

The Sheffield Institute for Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) specialises in research into MND and other neurodegenerative diseases. Recently the institute received an anonymous donation of £2.2 million to help translate their research from the lab to the clinic. This is a huge amount of money into MND research and this donation will enable the researchers to further our understanding of the disease.

Laboratory PhotoThe research

We know that approximately 10% of cases of MND are inherited. This means that they are characterised by a strong family history and the disease is caused directly by a mistake in a specific gene. Of these 10% of cases, 2% are caused by the SOD1 gene (meaning that for every 100 cases of MND, 10 cases are inherited and of these, only 2 are directly caused by the faulty SOD1 gene).

Prof Mimoun Azzouz’s research at SITraN was reported in a number of news outlets, highlighting how his research is paving the way to a treatment for a rare form of MND. His research is at a relatively early stage, where he has only just begun investigating the use of a technique known as ‘gene therapy’ in mice affected by the SOD1 inherited form of MND. If the research goes to plan, he will be able to submit a proposal for regulatory approval by August 2015. Read the rest of this entry »

Project-MinE

Barbara Thuss is project co-ordinator for Project MinE, an international initiative with the aim of sequencing at least 15,000 MND genomes. We announced earlier today that the MND Association is funding the UK-arm of this initiative, known as the Whole Genome Sequencing project. Here Barbara explains more about Project-MinE.

Although the precise cause of MND is still unknown, in recent years it has become increasingly clear that this devastating and fatal disease of the motor neurons has a genetic basis. Project-MinE is an ambitious international research initiative aimed at detecting genetic causes and risk factors for MND. The project has been initiated by two people living with MND, along with the ALS research group in the Netherlands.

mine Read the rest of this entry »

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