About Martina Slapkova

Research Information Co-ordinator at the Motor Neurone Disease Association

Lessons learnt in the past year…update on clinical trials

Looking for a treatment for MND is the ultimate goal of the whole MND community. Unfortunately, as MND is a very complicated disease, it is not as easy as it may sound. Setting aside the sheer cost of running trials, researchers have to look at all the possible causes of MND (the genes, lifestyle and environment) and then target these with specific compounds and hoping that this strategy won’t be halted by a different biological process. This is made even harder by the large number of possible combinations of these causative factors and the many different ways these can interact.

Thankfully, lots of research groups across the world are doing their best to tackle the adverse disease mechanisms, which is why we heard lots of results of early as well as late stage clinical trials, new strategies to design better treatments in the future, and lessons learnt from previous studies.

While there was much more to hear and read at the Symposium, here we summarise the Clinical trials session (4B), where five presenters reported results and analyses of the treatments they have been investigating. Continue reading

‘There is an app for that’ – the wonders of technology in ALS

At the end of a very busy Day 2 of the Symposium, I sat down with my colleagues for a quick chat. After a while, one of them, who has been with the Association since 1995 told us how someone once asked him: ‘So if you look at the last 20 years, how has the world progressed to know more about MND, since there is still no cure to halt it?’. ‘Technology!’, he replied without hesitation. (Alright, he is a tech guy by occupation, so his opinion might be a bit biased, but he still proves the point I am trying to make).

Technology in the world of research has progressed incredibly far. From the ability to sequence the whole genome of a person in a fraction of the time (and price) that we were able to do a decade ago, to using delicate electrodes and sensors to explore what is happening inside our bodies. Continue reading

It’s that time of the year again… #alssymp

It was only one week after the 27th International Symposium on ALS/MND in Dublin had ended when we started the next stage of planning for Boston 2017. Now a year has passed and we are here again, waiting to learn about the exciting research that is happening throughout the world. But before we start talking science to you, I thought I would give you a whistle-stop tour of what it takes to organise the Symposium.

It all starts with a selection of a venue at least three years prior the event. This has to tick a number of boxes, including appropriate number and size of rooms for platform and poster presentations, a place for exhibitors, lunch, ease of access both inside the venue as well as outside with respect to the location from transport facilities and so on. A number of site visits are organised to ensure that we are familiar with the venue so that we can plan the location of the platform sessions, locations for exhibitors, lunch, meetings, and networking. And then the year of the event comes… Continue reading

Tirasemtiv not found effective for treatment of MND

In their official press release published on 21 November 2017, Cytokinetics Inc. announced that they will not be continuing work on tirasemtiv after disappointing results in the latest Phase 3 clinical trial. The trial, known under the acronym ‘VITALITY-ALS’, tested whether the drug has a beneficial effect on the breathing function and muscle strength of people with MND. This is very unfortunate news for everyone affected by the disease, however, Cytokinetics are already testing another compound with the hope that this will be more effective and better tolerated than tirasemtiv.

Tirasemtiv is a drug that aims to improve quality of life of people living with MND by increasing strength of their skeletal muscles (controlling body motion and posture) and therefore postponing muscle fatigue. It compensates for the missing nerve signal from a motor neurone to a muscle that instructs it to contract. Tirasemtiv activates a protein called troponin by increasing its sensitivity to calcium, which is crucial for muscle contraction. Continue reading

Networking to progress in the world of science: Mini-Symposium on MND

Conferences and symposia are a crucial part of the research world – not only for the amount of knowledge that is communicated to large audiences but also for the exchange of ideas on a more inter-personal level. Novel ideas are created there as well establishment of collaborations that might lead to new research projects and clinical trials – all in all, putting a bunch of researchers in a venue with a projector, coffee and biscuits can only lead to good things!

One of the recent events that I had the pleasure to attend was a small-scale conference – the Mini-Symposium on generic disease mechanisms in MND and other neurodegenerative disorders. Held at the Brighton and Sussex Medical School in late June, this event was a precursor to the inauguration of a new MND Care and Research Centre for Sussex, directed by Prof Nigel Leigh. Continue reading

Shining a light on our non-clinical fellow: Using blue light to control muscle movement

The MND Association is proud to support the brightest minds of MND research. Outside of general healthcare and biomedical project grants that are usually awarded to senior researchers, we also offer opportunities to young researchers – these take the form of PhD studentships and fellowships.

Fellowships are awarded to post-doctoral researchers who are able to support a research project as the leading investigator. Depending on their qualifications, the fellowship can either be clinical (for healthcare professionals) or non-clinical (for researchers with purely academic background). In the last round of non-clinical fellowship applications in October 2016, the MND Association awarded a senior fellowship to Dr Barney Bryson of University College London. In his upcoming project, due to start in August 2017, he will follow up on the findings he found together with his team, led by Prof Linda Greensmith. Continue reading

Life of an MND researcher – part 2: PhD edition

Each year, the MND Association dedicates the month of June to raising MND awareness. This year, we focus on the eyes – in most people with MND the only part of their body they can still move and the only way left for them to communicate. Alongside the Association-wide campaign, the Research Development team selected six most-enquired about topics, which we will address through six dedicated blogs.

In our previous article we introduced four MND researchers who gave us an insight what a typical day in the life of a researcher looks like and what carrying out a research study actually involves. In this continuation article, you will get the chance to look into the lives of four PhD students, who give us an overview of their projects and their usual daily duties. Continue reading

Collaborating to find treatment for MND

21 June – MND Awareness Day

Each year, the MND Association dedicates the month of June to raising MND awareness. This year, we focus on the eyes – in most people with MND the only part of their body they can still move and the only way left for them to communicate. Alongside the Association-wide campaign, the Research Development team selected six most-enquired about topics, which we will address through six dedicated blogs. 

It is at the heart of the Association to fight MND by funding and promoting research into understanding the disease so that we can defeat it. However, we would not be able to fight this battle on our own and the support of various people is crucial to defeat this MND monster.

Everyone working in the field of MND research has one aim – to find what causes this disease and find a treatment to cure it. We have already written about the long elaborate process behind developing and licensing new drugs but we have not yet talked about the people who are essential for this process to run successfully. Continue reading

Life of an MND researcher: part 1

Each year, the MND Association dedicates the month of June to raising MND awareness. This year, we focus on the eyes – in most people with MND the only part of their body they can still move and the only way left for them to communicate. Alongside the Association-wide campaign, the Research Development team selected six most-enquired about topics, which we will address through six dedicated blogs.

We all know that rigorous research is the key to finding a cure for MND. Scientists are working hard every day to find the causes of MND, developing new treatments that would help tackle the disease and also looking for new ways to improve the quality of life of people currently living with the disease. But what does it take to have research at heart of everything you do? What is the typical day in the life of a researcher and what does carrying out a research study actually involves?

We asked eight researchers to give us an idea of what their research is all about and what their typical day looks like. Read about four of them in the following blog and keep an eye out for ‘Part 2: PhD edition‘ in the next few days… Continue reading

The journey of a drug – what it takes to be approved

Each year, the MND Association dedicates the month of June to raising MND awareness. This year, we focus on the eyes – in most people with MND the only part of their body they can still move and the only way left for them to communicate. Alongside the Association-wide campaign, the Research Development team selected six most-enquired about topics, which we will address through six dedicated blogs.

So far, there is no cure for MND. In the past 22 years, we have only seen approval of two drugs that were either shown to prolong the life of MND patients by several months (riluzole in 1995 in the US) or to slow down symptom progression (edaravone in 2015 in Japan). It is only reasonable that you might wonder ‘what is taking so long?’ or ‘why are there not more drugs available?’.

It is very competitive in the world of medicinal drugs. From thousands of chemical compounds that are gradually eliminated as they go through different stages of drug development, only one makes it near the finish line. This line represents approval for marketing authorisation and there is no guarantee that this ‘top compound’ will actually make it to the end. So let’s have a closer look at the individual stages that a potential drug has to go through in order to be crowned the champion. Continue reading