11th Lady Edith Wolfson Clinical Fellowship awarded

We are delighted to announce that Dr Arpan Mehta has been appointed as our latest Lady Edith Wolfson Fellow, jointly funded by the MND Association and Medical Research Council.  This clinical research training fellowship will help to launch his career as an aspiring academic neurologist, providing comprehensive training in cellular, molecular and bioinformatics technologies in a world-class environment.

Arpan is a neurology registrar in Oxford, who is taking time out from his clinical training to undertake his PhD in Edinburgh.  His project, supervised by Professors Siddharthan Chandran and Giles Hardingham at The University of Edinburgh, examines the most common known genetic mutation in motor neurone disease (MND), the C9orf72 mutation.  Arpan will exploit the recent advances in patient-derived stem cell modelling and gene editing to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying MND.

Each motor neurone has both a cell body and neurites.  The latter are specialised projections, the longest of which are called axons that make physical and electrical contact with neighbouring cells.  Arpan’s project, focused on understanding the reasons behind changes to the axon in MND, is stimulated by encouraging data from animal models of MND, showing that targeting the axon leads to delayed onset of disease and prolonged survival.  Patient-derived stem cell modelling provides an ideal platform for Arpan’s project.

Dr Arpan mehtaArpan said: “I am extremely grateful and honoured to have been awarded this generous fellowship, enabling me to undertake research using the latest technologies in such a vibrant regenerative neuroscience environment that is in Edinburgh.

“I look forward to sharing the details of my PhD journey with the MND Association community as time progresses!”

Arpan’s research in Edinburgh will benefit from the closely linked clinical and laboratory research networks of the Anne Rowling Regenerative Neurology Clinic, Euan MacDonald Centre for MND Research and the UK Dementia Research Institute at The University of Edinburgh.

New ALS review article available

ammar2.jpgLast week, The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) published a review article by Professors Ammar Al-Chalabi and Robert Brown, in which they looked at the up to date evidence on the incidence of ALS, pathological mechanisms of the disease, as well as genetics and therapeutic strategies.

We would very much like to thank the NEJM who kindly allowed us to share full text of this article on our website – this is now available to view here.

Closing the door on toxic proteins – new clues in understanding a genetic form of MND

The defects in the C9orf72 gene are known to cause motor neurone disease, but researchers don’t understand why. Defective copies of this gene are passed down in some families affected by the rare, inherited form of MND. This week MND Association grantees Drs Guillaume Hautbergue, Lydia Castelli and colleagues, based at the Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience have published their research study providing some important clues about the toxicity of C9orf72. Their research is published in the prestigious journal Nature Communications. Continue reading

ANXA11 – another gene closer to understanding ALS

A new research paper has been published today in the Science Translational Medicine journal, describing a new gene implicated in developing MND. What is this gene and why is it important for our fight against MND?

Although they are not the sole cause of MND, genes play a big role in someone’s probability of developing the disease. A number of such genes that make a person susceptible to developing MND have already been identified, with most of them causing the rarer, inherited form of the disease.

A new addition to a list of genes that are related to development of ALS, the most common form of MND, has been discovered by researchers from King’s College London. Dr Bradley Smith and colleagues screened genetic data of an unusually high number of people of European origin: 751 with inherited – familial – ALS (fALS) and 180 with non-inherited – sporadic – ALS (sALS). Detailed analysis of this data found that specific mutations in the ANXA11 gene are associated with around 1% of all fALS and 1.7% of all sALS cases. Continue reading

What goes wrong with electrical signalling in MND?

Last year, we introduced a PhD Studentship that we are funding at the University of St Andrews. Under the supervision of Dr Gareth Miles and Prof Siddharthan Chandran, the student working on this project, Amit Chouhan, is investigating why electrical signalling goes wrong in MND.

As the project enters its second year, Amit and the team have made some important discoveries… Continue reading

Epi Epi Epi, Oi Oi Oi

Mention the word Epidemiology and instantly my mind conjures up the Centre for Disease Control (CDC) in America being swarmed by zombies or men in bright orange astronaut-type suits in The Crazies.  While it’s true that it includes studying highly infectious diseases and how they spread (zombies and end of world scenarios aside!), it can be applied to any disease.

Having spent much of my time in the last year working on the data that was collected from our recent epidemiology study, I was keen to shout about the fact that the data is now ready for researchers to use. The analysis of this data will add great value to samples that we already have in our DNA Bank.

What is Epidemiology?

Continue reading

Exploring the interaction between TDP-43 and RNA

In light of the upcoming Biomedical Research Advisory Panel meeting happening on Friday 7 April that will discuss which new research projects the MND Association will fund, we are pleased to report on the progress of one of our already-funded researchers. In their three year project, funded by the MND Association, Prof Annalisa Pastore (King’s College London) and Prof Gian Tartaglia (University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona) are investigating the process by which TDP-43 binds to RNA. Below is a summary of the progress they made during their first year.

Background to the project

Alumni Board Meeting 2008

Annalisa Pastore, King’s College London

One of the causes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the most common type of motor neurone disease (MND), is related to faulty functioning of the TDP-43 protein, a component that is naturally present in all of our cells. In healthy cells, TDP-43 resides in the centre of a cell (the nucleus) where it attaches to RNA and supports correct gene expression – that is, it helps to extract information carried by a gene to form proteins, the main building blocks of our bodies.

Continue reading

Funding for Gut-sy MND research announced

Yesterday the Reta Lila Weston Trust announced that they will be funding Dr Nikhil Sharma and colleagues at the Leonard Wolfson Experimental Neurology Centre (LWENC) to investigate whether the bacteria that live in our guts could alter the progression of MND. The grant is for £1.2 million over a period of four years. The LWENC is run jointly by the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery (NHNN) and University College London (UCL).

Incredibly, researchers have found a link between the bacteria that live in our guts and important cells called microglia. We know that microglia help regulate the function of the motor neurones. This study aims to find out whether the balance of gut bacteria in MND could be linked to changes in microglia. Continue reading

Focus on the research presented in posters in Dublin

Over 100 talks were given at this month’s International Symposium on ALS/MND in Dublin. There were also over 450 posters of research being presented too. Time in the conference programme was allocated on Wednesday and Thursday evening (day 1 and day 2 of the 3 day conference) to visit the posters – you might think that scheduled at the end of the day they would be less well attended – but not a bit of it! It was an extremely loud and buzzy part of the conference.

Below is a brief round-up of some of the posters that caught my eye. Continue reading

Prize winning posters in Dublin

As well as all the networking, debate and new information being shared, the International Symposium on ALS/MND is also a time to celebrate achievements by the giving of awards. The Biomedical and Clinical poster prizes are an opportunity to recognise and celebrate the excellent research and clinical practice being conducted by those early in their career.

Now in its fourth year we hope that the poster prizes will help give the winners career a boost, and give them the encouragement and motivation to continue in MND/ALS research.poster-prize-winners-low-res This year the Panel selected an international group of winners: Dr Albert Lee from Australia and Elsa Tremblay from Canada were jointly awarded the Biomedical poster prize and Ruben van Eijk from The Netherlands won the Clinical poster prize. Each winner received a certificate and a glass engraved paperweight.

The prize winning research ranged from understanding the consequences of a newly discovered gene mutation linked to MND, to why the junction between nerves and muscles is one of the earliest signs of motor neurone damage, to a new statistical analysis to make clinical trials quicker and more efficient. Below I’ve explained more about the research that the winners presented. Continue reading