Prize winning posters in Dublin

As well as all the networking, debate and new information being shared, the International Symposium on ALS/MND is also a time to celebrate achievements by the giving of awards. The Biomedical and Clinical poster prizes are an opportunity to recognise and celebrate the excellent research and clinical practice being conducted by those early in their career.

Now in its fourth year we hope that the poster prizes will help give the winners career a boost, and give them the encouragement and motivation to continue in MND/ALS research.poster-prize-winners-low-res This year the Panel selected an international group of winners: Dr Albert Lee from Australia and Elsa Tremblay from Canada were jointly awarded the Biomedical poster prize and Ruben van Eijk from The Netherlands won the Clinical poster prize. Each winner received a certificate and a glass engraved paperweight.

The prize winning research ranged from understanding the consequences of a newly discovered gene mutation linked to MND, to why the junction between nerves and muscles is one of the earliest signs of motor neurone damage, to a new statistical analysis to make clinical trials quicker and more efficient. Below I’ve explained more about the research that the winners presented. Continue reading

ALS/MND Clinical Trial Guidelines: your opportunity to comment!

A few months ago we wrote an article about the ALS Clinical Trials Workshop which took place in Virginia, USA. Since then the Guidelines Working Groups have been busy turning the large number of issues debated into a first draft of a new set of guidelines. This is open for comment from 1- 31 August.

The guidelines will be posted on this website, and comments can be sent to guidelines.public.comments@gmail.com.

The guidelines are divided into sections:

  • Preclinical studies
  • Study design and biological and phenotypic heterogeneity
  • Outcome measures
  • Therapeutic / Symptomatic interventions in clinical trials
  • Patient recruitment and retention
  • Biomarkers
  • Different trial phases and beyond – (there are two sections on this)

Within each of these sections, there are many recommendations. The Clinical Trials Guidelines Investigators want to ensure that all interested people and stakeholders have an opportunity to provide input – whether you are a researcher, clinician or person with MND.

Thank you very much for your help.

For more information, please see a copy of their press release below: Continue reading

Re-evaluating clinical trial guidelines for MND

To mark International Clinical Trials Day (20 May) we reflect on the ALS Clinical Trials Guidelines workshop that took place in March. The MND Association co-sponsored this successful meeting, held at Airlie House in Virginia USA. Approximately 140 delegates from across the world attended, including 11 MND researchers and doctors from the UK.

Why was this meeting held?

The meeting was a key stage in the process to update (and improve) international guidelines for clinical trials in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, the most common form of MND).

The first international ALS clinical trials guideline workshop took place in 1998. The guidelines were designed to improve the quality of clinical trials in ALS, and provide evidence based recommendations to those designing and carrying out all stages of clinical trials. Continue reading

Stem cell trials in the news

The recent announcement about the use of stem cells to treat a form of multiple sclerosis (MS), together with early results from the BrainStorm stem cell amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) clinical trial in Israel have raised the profile of stem cells as a possible treatment for motor neurone disease.

Stem cells are unspecialised cells in the body which do not yet perform a particular function. They can renew themselves and have the ability to give rise to different types of cell, including nerve cells (motor neurones and the surrounding support cells).

Both the ALS/MND study (ALS is a type of motor neurone disease) and the MS study used stem cells found in bone marrow taken from the patient, and then given back to the same patient later on in the process. The MND study gave a new use to the bone marrow stem cells, whereas in the MS study ‘corrupt/damaged’ stem cells were replaced with a new healthier set.

Below we look at both trials in more detail and describe what they mean for people living with MND. Continue reading

Clinical trials update from Symposium

Clinical trials determine if potential treatments are safe and aim to prove beyond reasonable doubt whether a drug is beneficial. They are therefore the gold standard of treatment research.

More information on the different types of clinical trial can be found on our website and in our information sheet on the topic.

This year the Symposium session on clinical trials looked at three drugs and one therapy. Dr Brian Dickie has posted a separate blog on one of these drug treatments – Edaravone.

A summary of the results from the drugs and treatments discussed is below. More information on each of them in detail is later on in this blog.

Ibudilast: This drug was safe and well tolerated in those who were not using non-invasive ventilation. However, these are results from an early stage trial so more research is needed to establish possible long-term benefit.

Methylcobalamin (Vitamin B12 injections): If this treatment is given early (within 12 months of diagnosis) then it showed an effect at increasing survival in a small sub-group of those taking part in the trial. This effect was not seen when the treatment was given further on from diagnosis.

Stem cell therapy: This small, early Phase 1/2 trial was testing the safety of bone-marrow derived stem cell injections into the spinal cord. The researchers found this treatment had no major side effects. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of this treatment over the long-term.Clinical trial flow chart

Continue reading

Edaravone trial presentation sparks interest

Bar a few bacteria usually found hitching a ride on our dental plaque and digestive system, every living cell in the human body needs oxygen. Some cells need more oxygen that others, dependent on much energy they need to produce to function. Neurones are particularly active cells (the brain uses a fifth of all the oxygen consumed by the human body) and motor neurons are amongst the most energy hungry of all.

Unfortunately, the process of producing cellular energy isn’t 100% efficient: a small but constant amount of waste products called free radicals (yep, those things that the beauty product industry bangs on about) can build up in the cells. If not kept in check, they can start to wreak havoc within the cell.

Our cells have quite effective ways of dealing with free radicals, but these ‘cellular defences’ become less and less efficient with age. As we age, our energy production processes lose efficiency, causing a ‘double-whammy’ of not only more free radicals being produced, but also less effective ways of dealing with them. When neurones are damaged, as happens with neurodegenerative diseases, then everything gets exacerbated even further, leading to a vicious cycle of events. Continue reading

MIROCALS: Episode MND

A clinical trial of Jedi proportions…

The MND Association is backing a new clinical trial in MND, known as MIROCALS. This will be a joint clinical trial between France and the UK that will aim to dampen the overactive immune system by increasing the amount of interleukin-2.

It is important to stress that planning for this MND clinical trial has only just started and the next step is to lay the essential groundwork and perform some short-term pilot studies. The main trial is likely to begin recruiting participants in autumn 2016.

Continue reading

Understanding more about GM604

20141020_MND Kings College_290The MND Association’s Director of Research, Brian Dickie explains more about ‘GM6’, also known as ‘GM604’, a drug in development by an American pharmaceutical company Genervon.

The Association funds a wide range of research that leads to new understanding and treatments, which may one day, bring us closer to a cure for MND. We are hopeful that the increasing international research effort into the disease will accelerate the development of an effective treatment for MND. However for non scientists I also fully appreciate how the ‘system’ often seems designed to impede rather than assist this process.

There has been much discussion online about the results of a small scale study of a drug called GM604, or GM6, produced by the American pharmaceutical company Genervon. You can read some general comments about the drug on our website. I’ve written this blog to explain in a little more detail why the research community is cautious about the results. Continue reading

What is needed to advance a drug candidate into clinical trials?

The 25th International Symposium on ALS/MND began today in Brussels, Belgium. More than 900 delegates joined the opening session to hear Dr Alfred Sandrock from Biogen Idec’s opening talk.

drug

The only proven drug for MND is riluzole. This is the only treatment to have passed all stages of clinical trial testing, showing it to be both safe and beneficial in MND. New treatments are desperately needed, but what is needed to advance a treatment that has shown promise in animals to humans?  Continue reading