Edaravone – a month on since the FDA announcement

It’s been over a month since the announcement by the FDA of their decision to licence edaravone / Radicava for people with MND in the USA. The speed of the FDA’s decision took the drug company MT Pharma and the MND research community by suprise. It is encouraging that edaravone has been licenced to treat MND after two decades of failed drug trials. Since the FDA announcement the effects of the drug and what it means for people with MND has been extensively discussed and some of the trial data has been published.

This blog is an update on what studies have been done on edaravone and the likelihood of people with MND noticing a beneficial effect if they were to receive it. Continue reading

Edaravone (Radicava) approved to treat MND in USA – what does this mean for people with MND in the UK

On Friday 5 May in America, the FDA, the organisation that approves drugs, announced that they’d granted a licence for the drug known as a Edaravone (to be marketed as Radicava ) for the treatment of MND. It’s unexpected news and we’re currently working out what this means for people with MND in the UK. Below is more information on what we know so far:

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Edaravone trial presentation sparks interest

Bar a few bacteria usually found hitching a ride on our dental plaque and digestive system, every living cell in the human body needs oxygen. Some cells need more oxygen that others, dependent on much energy they need to produce to function. Neurones are particularly active cells (the brain uses a fifth of all the oxygen consumed by the human body) and motor neurons are amongst the most energy hungry of all.

Unfortunately, the process of producing cellular energy isn’t 100% efficient: a small but constant amount of waste products called free radicals (yep, those things that the beauty product industry bangs on about) can build up in the cells. If not kept in check, they can start to wreak havoc within the cell.

Our cells have quite effective ways of dealing with free radicals, but these ‘cellular defences’ become less and less efficient with age. As we age, our energy production processes lose efficiency, causing a ‘double-whammy’ of not only more free radicals being produced, but also less effective ways of dealing with them. When neurones are damaged, as happens with neurodegenerative diseases, then everything gets exacerbated even further, leading to a vicious cycle of events. Continue reading