Are there differences between FTD alone and FTD-MND?

The last of our FTD awareness week blog posts is focussing on a healthcare project looking into FTD (frontotemporal dementia) and FTD-MND (FTD when combined with MND). The project began last year and is being part-funded by us.

Jennie Adams

Jennie Adams

Professor Julie Snowden and PhD student Jennie Adams at the Cerebral Function Unit in Salford (University of Manchester) are looking into the behavioural and cognitive aspects of FTD and FTD-MND.

They are aiming to work out if there are any differences in thinking or behaviour between people who have MND-FTD and those who have FTD on its own.

For example this could be looking to see if people with FTD-MND tend to show more difficulties with language, but not have many changes relating to behaviour. Or if people with ‘pure’ FTD show more difficulties with appropriate behaviour in public, compared to organisation and planning skills. Continue reading

Hunting for clues about the genetic causes of FTD and MND

Yesterday we published an introductory blog on frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and described how it is sometimes found in combination with MND.

Today we are looking at a biomedical project on FTD and MND that we are funding.

The project

Dr Olaf Ansorge and Professor Kevin Talbot of Oxford University are leading a biomedical project aimed at identifying cell changes in the brain tissues of people who had MND, FTD, or developed both conditions (FTD-MND).

The aim of their research project is to identify which nerve cells within the brain are most likely to be affected by faulty proteins known to contribute to both FTD and MND. Knowing which brain cells are affected, and by which proteins, will help explain the genetic differences between the two conditions. Continue reading

Cognitive Change and MND

In addition to the muscle weakness and wasting, MND also presents with non-motor symptoms, one of the most common being cognitive change.

Research has already shown that changes can occur to the nerve cells in the frontal and temporal lobe areas of the brain. These are the two areas which are responsible for controlling thinking, reasoning and behaviour.

Frontotemporal dementia, or FTD for short, is a rare form of dementia (cognitive impairment). One sub-type of FTD is sometimes found in people who have MND.

The first ever World FTD Awareness week is being held between 4-11 October.

To help raise awareness we are posting a series of blogs this week looking at FTD and research we are funding into this condition.

What is FTD?brain

The main symptoms of FTD are linked to behavioural and mood changes, such as loss of inhibitions, being unable to empathise with others, or showing repetitive behaviours.

Many people with FTD also have changes to their speech and vocabulary, such as using the wrong word for something – for example calling a sheep a dog, or becoming less articulate in their speech. Some people can also gradually lose their ability to speak.

Thinking can also be affected, with FTD affecting someone’s ability to plan properly and their organisational skills.

FTD is brought about by nerve cells within the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain dying, because the pathways connecting the nerve cells to each other become altered. The chemical messengers that pass on information from one nerve to another can sometimes also be lost.

More information on FTD can be found on the NHS website, FTD Talk website or on the FTD support forum.

There are also two information sheets that the Association produce covering changes to thinking: ‘Will the way I think be affected?‘ and ‘How do I support someone if the way they think is affected?‘.

Healthcare professionals can also access our resources on cognitive change, FTD and MND on the ‘For professionals’ area on our website. Continue reading

Is MND/FTD the same as FTD alone?

brain Association-funded researcher, Prof Julie Snowden from the University of Manchester was invited to present her research on MND and frontotemporal dementia at this year’s 25th International Symposium on ALS/MND. She is asking whether people living with MND and frontotemporal dementia develop a different form of dementia that is different to those with frontotemporal dementia alone.

In 2011, when researchers discovered the C9orf72 inherited-MND gene, it was also linked to the related neurodegenerative disease frontotemporal dementia (find out more about inherited MND here). This increasingly recognised form of dementia has different signs and symptoms to the more common Alzheimer’s disease, but is less understood.

Researchers are now studying these previously separate diseases together. By working collaboratively with dementia researchers, we are beginning to understand this gene and the link between the two diseases. But what precisely is this link? In the past there were distinct disorders? Prof Snowden answered these questions as thinking of MND and FTD as a spectrum.  Continue reading

Toxic proteins may cause motor neurones to die in C9orf72 MND

MND Association and Alzheimer’s Research UK-funded researchers from University College London have identified that toxic proteins may cause motor neurones to die in C9orf72 MND and frontotemporal dementia. Published open access in the journal Science on Thursday 7 August, this research explains more about one of the most common forms of inherited MND.

The brain of a transgenic fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, used to study neurodegenerative diseases, with cell nuclei (stained purple) and glial cells (green). Image courtesy of Teresa Niccoli, UCL Institute of Ageing, London, UK.

Continue reading

Postcard from Australia

Emma Devenney at this year's symposium in Milan

Emma Devenney at last year’s symposium in Milan

Dr Emma Devenney is an MND Association and Neuroscience Research Australia funded PhD student investigating the Cerebellum in MND and Frontotemporal Dementia at Neuroscience Research Australia. She is finding out what role it plays in the symptoms of patients with the C9orf72 mutation. Here she blogs about her work from Australia!

Finally after more than 12 months of preparation and anticipation I touched down in Sydney to be greeted by a city in the throes of early summer. Sydney in the summer is the epitome of the Australian dream and it is easy to see how it has enticed many Irish and British immigrants to its shores. The blue skies, beautiful beaches and a lively cultural and social scene are amongst many of the cities attractions and distractions.

Neuroscience Research Australia is in the exuberant Eastern suburbs of Sydney; an area where the British and Irish expatriate communities have integrated well into Australian society and are as reliant on a daily ‘flat white’ as any self-respecting Australian. The research centre is located down the hill from the Prince of Wales hospital in the suburb of Randwick. Continue reading

Neuroimaging – can we see more clearly?

Plenary speaker Dr Massimo Filippi put this question to delegates on the second day of the 24th International Symposium on ALS/MND.

Opening the session on neuroimaging, Dr Filippi gave an excellent review on what we currently know about this area of research, and ultimately answering whether or not we can see more clearly in MND?

Neuroimaging - now and then.

Neuroimaging – now and then.

It’s all in your head – Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Over the past ten years there have been significant advances in the identification of neuroimaging patterns in MND. Dr Filippi focused mainly on the use of MRI neuroimaging (a technique used to visualise changes in the brain). He stated: “Through the use of MRI we have been able to detect cortical thickness of the Cerebral cortex (the outermost layer of the brain), which is significantly reduced in MND”.

Continue reading

Screening for Cognitive and Behavioural Change in MND

sharon abrahams and princess royalMND Association-funded researcher Dr Sharon Abrahams (University of Edinburgh) has recently published an article on the Edinburgh Cognitive ALS Screen (ECAS) in the prestigious journal Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration.

It is now recognised that, in up to 50% of people living with MND not only the motor system (walking, talking breathing etc) but also other areas of the brain, particularly those involved in thinking, language and behaviour are affected.

Frontotemporal Dementia

Cognitive and behavioural changes are increasingly common in MND. It is also well known that a small proportion of people living with MND display features of frontotemporal dementia.

Continue reading