Lessons learnt in the past year…update on clinical trials

Looking for a treatment for MND is the ultimate goal of the whole MND community. Unfortunately, as MND is a very complicated disease, it is not as easy as it may sound. Setting aside the sheer cost of running trials, researchers have to look at all the possible causes of MND (the genes, lifestyle and environment) and then target these with specific compounds and hoping that this strategy won’t be halted by a different biological process. This is made even harder by the large number of possible combinations of these causative factors and the many different ways these can interact.

Thankfully, lots of research groups across the world are doing their best to tackle the adverse disease mechanisms, which is why we heard lots of results of early as well as late stage clinical trials, new strategies to design better treatments in the future, and lessons learnt from previous studies.

While there was much more to hear and read at the Symposium, here we summarise the Clinical trials session (4B), where five presenters reported results and analyses of the treatments they have been investigating. Continue reading

Libraries, Doormen and Harry Potter

I usually travel to London two to three times a month for meetings and lab visits. If I’ve got any length of spare time, I head for what I call my ‘London office’ – aka the British Library. It’s close to Euston station, it’s free (!) it has a nice café for informal meetings and it has copies of all the latest textbooks and major research journals.

The way in which a cell turns its genetic instructions into the protein ‘building blocks’ it needs to function and survive is sometimes compared to a library. Continue reading

Understanding disease variability – the 2017 IPG prize winner

Warmest congratulation to Dr Marka van Blitterswijk of the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, winner of this year’s Paulo Gontijo Prize in Medicine.

The Award is presented to an outstanding young investigator working on ALS/MND, with judging based on the significance of a recent scientific paper published by each applicant, plus an evaluation of the relevance and impact of their career to date. I have had the pleasure of serving on the Judging Committee, Chaired by Prof Mamede de Carvahlo, since 2011 and each year the competition gets tougher and tougher. It is so heartening to see the increasing number of excellent young scientists dedicating their careers to the fight. Continue reading

It’s that time of the year again… #alssymp

It was only one week after the 27th International Symposium on ALS/MND in Dublin had ended when we started the next stage of planning for Boston 2017. Now a year has passed and we are here again, waiting to learn about the exciting research that is happening throughout the world. But before we start talking science to you, I thought I would give you a whistle-stop tour of what it takes to organise the Symposium.

It all starts with a selection of a venue at least three years prior the event. This has to tick a number of boxes, including appropriate number and size of rooms for platform and poster presentations, a place for exhibitors, lunch, ease of access both inside the venue as well as outside with respect to the location from transport facilities and so on. A number of site visits are organised to ensure that we are familiar with the venue so that we can plan the location of the platform sessions, locations for exhibitors, lunch, meetings, and networking. And then the year of the event comes… Continue reading

Symposium abstracts available online

28th Abstract bookThe 28th International Symposium on ALS/MND in Boston, USA is fast approaching with only three weeks to go. Over 1,000 delegates will come from across the world to listen to over 100 talks and see around 450 posters. To see what will be discussed in these presentations, you can now download the full abstract book from the Taylor and Francis website (volume 18, S2 November 2017).

For an overview of the talks, you can visit the Symposium website or download a print version of the programme.

We will be reporting from the Symposium to update you on what was discussed in the sessions via the Symposium website and using #alssymp via our Twitter account @mndassoc.

Networking to progress in the world of science: Mini-Symposium on MND

Conferences and symposia are a crucial part of the research world – not only for the amount of knowledge that is communicated to large audiences but also for the exchange of ideas on a more inter-personal level. Novel ideas are created there as well establishment of collaborations that might lead to new research projects and clinical trials – all in all, putting a bunch of researchers in a venue with a projector, coffee and biscuits can only lead to good things!

One of the recent events that I had the pleasure to attend was a small-scale conference – the Mini-Symposium on generic disease mechanisms in MND and other neurodegenerative disorders. Held at the Brighton and Sussex Medical School in late June, this event was a precursor to the inauguration of a new MND Care and Research Centre for Sussex, directed by Prof Nigel Leigh. Continue reading

Countdown to the symposium

We organise the International Symposium on ALS/MND every year and it is regarded by the global MND research and healthcare communities as the conference to hear about and discuss advances in their respective fields.

In two weeks time, we’ll be in Orlando, Florida making our final preparations for this years’ three day conference that begins on 10 December. As all of our equipment has been shipped to America ahead of our arrival, I’ll be keeping my fingers crossed that it’ll all be waiting for us at the hotel!

I’m sure with less than two weeks to go, delegates of the symposium are also reaching their final preparations, such as finishing off their posters (maximum of 1metre square), preparing their speeches and trying to work out a ‘to-do’ list of things they want to achieve at the symposium – such as meeting a researcher they’re interested in collaborating with, or simply to learn more about a new topic. Once we arrive in two weeks time, we’ll be setting up the order for the poster session. With nearly 300 posters split into 11 themes this isn’t going to be an easy task and will be a rush against the clock to finish before keen poster presenters sneak into the poster room to put up their work for all to see. Until then, it’s a waiting game for everybody where we’re all eager for the symposium to begin on 10 December.

This year, I will be blogging from the symposium to keep you up-to-date with our highlights and insights. To help me report on the clinical sessions at the symposium are Kevin Thomas and Jane Connell, who are our regional care development advisers for North Wales and East Midlands respectively.

We’re extremely excited to be reporting via our blog this year and we hope that you will enjoy reading our posts on the highlights and insights from the International Symposium on ALS/MND from 10-13 December 2010.