Using DNA Bank samples to create iPSC models of MND

Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has enabled researchers to create and study living human motor neurones in the lab, derived originally from patient skin cells.

DNABankLogoThis project (our reference 80-970-797) is a collaboration between the labs of Professors Chris Shaw and Jack Price at King’s College in London and Siddharthan Chandran in Edinburgh. It aims to use the already collected white blood cell samples within the UK MND DNA Bank to create a larger number of new iPSC models of MND. Ultimately creating an MND iPSC cell bank, these models will enable researchers to better understand the disease and screen potential new drugs. Continue reading

Professor Ammar Al-Chalabi wins prestigious prize

Huge congratulations to Professor Ammar Al-Chalabi for winning the prestigious Sheila Essey Award at the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) research conference taking place in Vancouver, Canada.

Professor Al-Chalabi is an MND Association funded researcher and Professor of Neurology and Complex Disease Genetics at King’s College London. He is also the Director of our MND Care and Research Centre at King’s.

The Sheila Essey Award is jointly given by the AAN and the ALS Association in the USA, and recognises an individual who has made significant research contributions in the search for the cause, prevention of, and cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, a type of MND).

Prof Al-Chalabi is receiving the award for his role in helping us learn more about the complex causes of MND, including the role of genetics in the non-familial form of MND.

“It is a wonderful acknowledgement of the work the present and past members of my team have done in ALS/MND research,” Prof Al-Chalabi said. Continue reading

Looking for MND genes: Project MinE update

Project MinE is an international genetics project that is analysing DNA from people with MND in detail.

For the majority of people with MND, the disease appears ‘sporadically’ for no apparent reason. For a small number of people, approximately 5-10% of those with MND there is an inherited link, in other words the disease runs in their families.

We know a lot about the genes that are damaged in the rare inherited forms of MND. We also know that very subtle genetic factors, together with environmental and lifestyle factors contribute to why the majority of people develop the disease. These subtle genetic factors are very hard to find.

The goal of Project MinE is to find the other genes that cause inherited MND and help us find out more about these subtle genetic risk factors.

mine

Project MinE was born when Dutch entrepreneur Bernard Muller challenged his neurologist to do something with all the DNA samples in his freezer – samples being stored there for future analysis. ‘Why can’t those samples be analysed now?’ was his question. That was two years ago! Continue reading

Buckets more research – some of our plans for the Ice Bucket Challenge money

Today’s announcement of the difference the ALS / MND ice bucket challenge has made included a number of areas of research investment. You’ll be hearing much more about these as our plans develop, but here are three examples to give you a flavour of things to come.

ibc oxford

Oxford researchers get an icing!

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On the seventh day of Christmas MND research gave to me: Seven research strategy themes

“On the seventh day of Christmas MND research gives to you… our SEVEN research strategy themes”

It’s New Year’s eve, a time to look back and celebrate on 2014 and our MND research achievements. It’s also a time to look to the future; in 2015 we will be funding new MND research in line with our research strategy.

Our 2010-2015 research strategy focuses on seven key themes.

causes1) Identifying the causes of MND

The exact cause of the majority of cases of MND is still unknown. Therefore identifying the causes is our first step in understanding MND and developing future treatments.

In 2014 we identified two new inherited MND genes and also announced funding for the UK Whole Genome Sequencing project to better identify the rarer genetic factors involved in causing the disease. Read more.

models2) Create and validate new models

Once we identify a genetic cause of MND, we need to find out how this gene causes MND. Animal and cellular models help us to find out how the gene affects the motor neurones and how this causes disease in a complex animal system. Continue reading

Our DNA Bank: the times they are a changing..

DNABankLogoThis autumn sees an exciting new development in the MND Association’s DNA Bank. Researchers can now use the samples within it to understand why motor neurones die as well as what the triggers are for MND.

How the DNA Bank began

Beginning in 2003 and running until 2012, approximately 1,500 people with MND, 1,000 healthy ‘controls’ – often the partner or spouse of someone with MND – and a further 500 members of families affected by MND gave a blood sample to help researchers understand more about the genetic causes of MND.

Continue reading

Very ‘ice’ research

The ALS #icebucketchallenge, which started in America, has now well and truly hit the UK! The social media craze has seen thousands of people getting involved in raising awareness of ‘ALS’( the most common form of MND), and funds for the Association, by placing a bucket of ice-cold water over their heads. But what happens to the donations?

The #icebucketchallenge has raised awareness of MND and has got people asking ‘what is ALS/MND?’ The donations raised will enable us to support people with MND and fund vital research. We thought we would share with you some of our ‘coolest’ research this bank holiday weekend, which the #icebucketchallenge is helping to fund:

The UK MND DNA bank (link to previous blog) freezers store DNA at a rather chilly -80°C! Now, that’s a lot colder than any #icebucketchallenge (image courtesy of CIGMR Biobank)

The UK MND DNA bank freezers store DNA at a rather chilly -80°C! Now, that’s a lot colder than any #icebucketchallenge (image courtesy of CIGMR Biobank)

Continue reading

The UK Whole Genome Sequencing project

Dr Samantha Price is the Research Information Co-ordinator at the MND Association. As well as organising the ‘blog a day’ during MND Awareness Month she also communicates the latest news about MND research. Here she blogs about the MND Association’s announcement of the UK Whole Genome Sequencing project.

It’s been a brilliant Awareness Month with blogs about zebrafish research and streaking meerkats. To end on a positive research note, we’re delighted to announce that we are funding a UK Whole Genome Sequencing project to help us understand more about the causes of MND. Utilising samples from our own UK MND DNA bank; researchers in the UK will aim to sequence 1,500 genomes to help identify more of the genetic factors involved in the disease.  Continue reading

The life of a DNA bank sample: the biobanking process

The MND Association is custodian of the UK MND DNA Bank. Over 3,000 people with MND, carers and family members donated blood samples to the Bank, from which DNA was extracted, ready for use by the MND research community. The logistics of managing, storing and sending out the correct samples for researchers to use is a huge task. This is managed by a unit at the University of Manchester called BioBanking Solutions. Below some of the key steps in looking after the samples are explained.

samplesWork on biobanking at the Centre for Integrated Genomic Medical Research (CIGMR) at the University of Manchester covers most of the steps in the life of a human sample. So much so that there is a dedicated unit within CIGMR called BioBanking Solutions!

This means they have an ISO 9001:2008 certified biobanking facility for researchers from across the world. They undertake work for collection, processing, storage and distribution of samples for the research community. There are 120 collections under their management, covering a range of different conditions from diabetes, to eczema to motor neurone disease. So, if you think that one collection equals one biobank, then BioBanking Solutions has 120 biobanks!

BioBanking Solutions currently stores 553,887 aliquots in a variety of sample types. The MND Association collection has 11,207 aliquots from 3,362 individuals.

Here’s a description of how we handle the samples from door to door: Continue reading

The UK MND DNA Bank 6 months on…

It’s been six months since the UK MND DNA Bank (DNA Bank) opened its doors to researchers around the world, so what has been happening to all those samples? Dr Lucy Smith, Research Information Administrator at the MND Association, explains:

Freezer at BioBanking Solutions

Freezer at BioBanking Solutions

The DNA Bank is the first UK biobank dedicated to MND and has 3000 samples under its roof. Over an 8 year period, blood samples were collected from people living with MND and their family members, together with unrelated controls. The DNA was extracted, and the entire collection is now stored and managed in partnership with BioBanking Solutions (BBS) at the University of Manchester. Important clinical information, such as gender and the age of onset of the people who gave the sample is also stored within the collection.

Alongside DNA, the DNA Bank also stores some cells lines at the European Collection of Cell Cultures (ECACC), Public Health England. The cell lines were made as a guarantee that the DNA supply wouldn’t run out, however the cell lines have become hugely important over recent years and are now a valuable resource themselves.

So, how have the samples been used? Continue reading